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Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of late Miocene record of Lepas Linnaeus (Cirripedia, Lepadidae) from southern California found in the catalog.

late Miocene record of Lepas Linnaeus (Cirripedia, Lepadidae) from southern California

Victor A. Zullo

late Miocene record of Lepas Linnaeus (Cirripedia, Lepadidae) from southern California

by Victor A. Zullo

  • 153 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Natural History Museum, Los Angeles County in [Los Angeles] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • California.
    • Subjects:
    • Cirripedia, Fossil.,
    • Paleontology -- Miocene.,
    • Paleontology -- California.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 6.

      Statementby Victor A. Zullo.
      SeriesContributions in science,, no. 241
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQ11 .L52 no. 241, QE817.C5 .L52 no. 241
      The Physical Object
      Pagination6 p.
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3134722M
      LC Control Number82461742

      The Miocene Epoch, to million years ago,* was a time of warmer global climates than those in the preceeding Oligocene or the following Pliocene and it's notable in that two major ecosystems made their first appearances: kelp forests and grasslands. The expansion of grasslands is correlated to a drying of continental interiors as the. Miocene hominoid locality of Can Llobateres, about twenty kilo-meters northeast of Barcelona. When I suggested that we take a trip to the site late that afternoon, André was thrilled. We drove to the site to look over the area. I wanted André to run around a bit, and I gave him a pick to poke around with. I was also looking forFile Size: KB.

      The high-resolution magnetostratigraphic records from the four cored sections contain many more polarity reversals than the accepted polarity time scale for the late Miocene and Pliocene; because of this, only the broader polarity intervals in the Cited by:   The late Cretaceous Quetzalcoatlus, for example, attained wingspans of up to 35 feet, about the size of a small plane--so while the late Miocene Pelagornis, which lived about 55 million years later, was still impressive, its wingspan of "only" about 15 to 20 feet places it firmly in the "runner-up" category.

      Miocene Epoch. Notable in the development of primates and human evolution, are fossilized remains of Ardipithecus ramidus, perhaps one of the earliest identifiable ancestors of ized remains found in Ethiopia date to approximately six million years ago, near the end of the Miocene Epoch. Importantly, the fossilized bones found provide evidence that . Chapter 13 - The Neogene Period Lesson The Miocene Epoch The Miocene is a geological epoch of the Neogene Period and extends from about to million years before the present ( to Ma). The Miocene was named by Sir Charles Lyell.


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Late Miocene record of Lepas Linnaeus (Cirripedia, Lepadidae) from southern California by Victor A. Zullo Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Late Miocene (also known as Upper Miocene) is a sub-epoch of the Miocene Epoch made up of two stages. The Tortonian and Messinian stages comprise the Late Miocene sub-epoch, which lasted from Ma (million years ago) to Ma. This geochronology article is a stub.

You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. The Miocene (/ ˈ m aɪ. ə ˌ s iː n, ˈ m aɪ. oʊ-/ MY-ə-seen, MY-oh-) is the first geological epoch of the Neogene Period and extends from about (Ma).

The Miocene was named by Charles Lyell; its name comes from the Greek words μείων (meiōn, "less") and καινός (kainos, "new") and means "less recent" because it has 18% fewer modern sea invertebrates than the Pliocene.

A late Miocene record of Lepas Linnaeus (Cirripedia, Lepadidae) from Southern California VolumePage 1 Midwater fishes from the Gulf of. Miocene Epoch, earliest major worldwide division of the Neogene Period (23 million to million years ago) that extended from 23 million to million years ago, a time when land-dwelling mammals were essentially modern.

Fully half of the mammalian families known today are present in the Miocene record. The Age of Mammals: The Oligocene & Miocene Epochs (The Prehistoric Earth) Library Binding – December 1, The Late Triassic & Early Jurassic Epochs: The Late Triassic and Early Jurassic Periods (The Prehistoric Earth) Thom Holmes.

out of 5 stars /5(1). were a few notable trends in mammalian evolution during the Miocene epoch. The prehistoric horses of North America took advantage of the spread of open grasslands and began to evolve toward their modern form; transitional genera included Hypohippus, Merychippus and Hipparion (oddly enough, Miohippus, the "Miocene horse,".

In late Miocene ( Ma), offshore sea surface temperatures increased substantially from a winter minimum of 10°C to 17°C by the earliest Pliocene (Barron ). Sea surface temperatures. Late Miocene fossil apes from Africa 25 Aug Time for some attention to the Miocene apes.

I’ve neglected them for the last few years, and there have been some interesting finds. I don’t mean the stuff that most people find interesting – near-complete skeletons, or discovery of rare postcranial elements.

The word miocene is derived from the Greek words meion (meaning “less”) and kainos (meaning “recent or new”).This epoch was named by geologist Sir Charles Lyell. The name refers to the fact that it has 18% fewer modern sea invertebrates than the Miocene Epoch was the earliest division of the Neogene Period which occurred million years.

Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History,Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, Contributions in Science, Number pages with 3 figures and 1 table. Softbound, previous book stamp, minor signs of use and age, very good condition. $ Hypothesized cercopithecoid dispersal routes out of Africa in relation to the known late Miocene fossil record.

The oldest cercopithecine, Parapapio lothagamensis (light blue circles), is known. Miocene synonyms, Miocene pronunciation, Miocene translation, English dictionary definition of Miocene. adj. Of, relating to, or being the epoch of geologic time from about 23 to million years ago, the fourth epoch of the Tertiary Period.

The Miocene or "less recent" is so called because it contains fewer modern animals than the following, Pliocene, epoch. The Miocene lasted from 18 million years, making it the longest epoch of the Cenozoic era.

This was a huge time of transition, the end of the old prehistoric world and the birth of the more recent sort of world. Introduction. Late Miocene (~ 11 Ma –5 Ma) climate as recorded by the δ 18 O values of foraminifera is among the longest periods of relative stability of the past 60 m.y.

Predated by the second major increase in foraminiferal δ 18 O values signifying expanse of ice on Antarctica at ~ 14 Ma (the first denoting the Eocene/Oligocene boundary), and followed by a further increase Cited by:   In North America, equids reached their maximum diversity in the middle Miocene but their diversity was greatly reduced in the Hemphillian (late Miocene and earliest Pliocene, or about 7 to Myr.

The Miocene is the first epoch of the Neogene period of the Cainozoic. It started about 23 million years ago and ended about million years ago. The rock beds that mark the start and end are well known, but the exact dates of the start and end of the period are uncertain.

The biota becomes 'modern'. The Miocene was named by Sir Charles Lyell. Miocene -Pliocene 1. • The Miocene Epoch (meaning "moderately recent") extends from approximately 23 million years ago until 5 million years ago.

It was during the Miocene that a new ecological niche was filled, as grazing animals. A Late Miocene Record of Lepas Linnaeus (Cirripedia, Lepadidae) from Southern California. Los Angeles County Museum,Contributions in Science,12 figures.

Off-prints, minor signs of use and age discoloration, text in very good condition. $ Abstract. Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site in the North Atlantic contains a complete latest Miocene to early Pliocene section that was tuned to the astronomical timescale by correlating the record of gamma ray attenuation (GRA) bulk density to summer insolation at 65°N and the benthic δ 18 O signal to orbital obliquity for the interval from to Ma.

Late Pliocene synonyms, Late Pliocene pronunciation, Late Pliocene translation, English dictionary definition of Late Pliocene. adj. Of, relating to, or being the epoch of geologic time from to million years ago, the most recent epoch of the Tertiary Period.

The Miocene Arrow continues McMullen's story of a far-future Earth flung back to its pre-technological roots. Ultra-light American diesel gunwings can hold their own against Australian human-powered battle computers and a tram-based net.

But they are helpless against the ultimate doomsday machine: The Miocene Arrow/5(28).Pliocene Epoch, second of two major worldwide divisions of the Neogene Period, spanning the interval from about million to million years ago.

The Pliocene follows the Miocene Epoch (23 million to million years ago) and is further subdivided into two ages and their corresponding rock.Miocene epoch a division of the TERTIARY PERIOD, lasting from 26 million years ago until 7 million years this epoch mammals acquired their present form.

The European flora became more temperate, grasslands increased and the British Isles reached more or less the present latitude of 54 °N.